Family of Alan Turing visit Bletchley Park

Poignant tour shows family the legacy of codebreaking genius

More than twenty members of Codebreaker Alan Turing’s family visited Bletchley Park on Sunday 8 February. Seventy three years after the famous mathematician worked at Bletchley Park, his relatives paid a poignant visit to the World War Two codebreaking centre in tribute to his work and legacy. For some family members, it was the first time they had seen Alan Turing’s office in the iconic Codebreaking Hut 8 he headed up, the Cottages within which he worked in the Stableyard and Huts 11 and 11A which housed Turing’s brainchild, the Bombe machines he developed with fellow Codebreaker, Gordon Welchman.

Sir John Dermot Turing, nephew of Alan and Bletchley Park Trustee, spoke about the exciting plan to breathe life into the newly-restored, but currently empty, Hut 11A to tell the story of the development of its wartime, electro-mechanical residents, the Turing-Welchman Bombe machines. He also discussed opportunities to get involved with the project by supporting fundraising activities. Sir John Dermot Turing said "It was tremendously exciting for us as a family to look around Bletchley Park and absorb the atmosphere in which our famous relative achieved so much for the nation and for the future of technology. We were particularly delighted to be able to help raise awareness of the need for further restoration of Bletchley Park, which will inspire future generations by telling the incredible story of what happened here."  Click here to see the Turing family slide show.