Michael Smith

Michael Smith is the author of a number of histories of Bletchley Park, including his latest book The Secrets of Station X, which explains precisely how Britain’s wartime Codebreakers helped win the war and The Emperor's Codes, the story of Bletchley Park’s important and underplayed role in breaking Japanese codes and ciphers.

His other books on Bletchley include: Britain’s Secret War 1939-45, which details the work of all Britain’s wartime intelligence services, placing the Bletchley codebreakers in context; The Bletchley Park Codebreakers (edited with Ralph Erskine) the royalties of which go to the Bletchley Park Trust; and the number one bestseller Station X: The Codebreakers of Bletchley Park.

Michael spent ten years in the British Army’s Intelligence Corps working on signals intelligence operations similar to those carried out at Bletchley Park. After leaving the army, he joined the BBC Monitoring Service. He then moved to the Daily Telegraph where he worked as a desk editor, news reporter and defence correspondent before becoming defence editor of the Sunday Times.

He is now a full-time author and screenwriter. He is married and lives near Henley-on-Thames. As well as writing on Bletchley Park, he is the author of a number of other best-selling books including The Spying Game; Killer Elite: America's Most Secret Special Operations Team and Foley: The Spy Who Saved 10,000 Jews, which led to the recognition of former MI6 officer Frank Foley as Righteous Among Nations, the same award given to Raoul Wallenberg and Oskar Schindler.

Michael Smith